Isadoras antique jewelry

Monthly Archives: April 2013

  • What We Value

    Every year, we at Isadoras, take a moment to discuss where we are as a store, where we would like to go, and what our message is for the year.  And as a store we remain pretty consistent, as the values and the value of antique jewelry remains the same.

    We believe in the superior craftsmanship and artistry of antique jewelry.  We believe in the investment worthiness of antique jewelry.  We believe buying and selling antique jewelry is a form of high-end recycling: It is an excellent way to avoid the damage of ecologically poor mining methods.  We believe that the surest way to avoid buying today’s blood diamonds, is to buy diamonds that predate today’s conflicts.

    And we are pretty good at promoting these values.  There is one core Isadoras value, however, that we often fail to promote, although we live it everyday--The importance of individual connection, in our relationships to our clients and to our jewelry.

    We don’t choose a piece of  jewelry for our collection based on age, although all our pieces are old, we choose a piece of jewelry for our collection because that individual piece of antique jewelry speaks to us, as individually unique and beautiful.  And we don’t see our clients as a collective or a set of demographics, but as individuals with different lives and likes.  Our favorite thing in the world is to find the individual piece of jewelry that matches the individual person.

    And so, as we launch our new website, we want to highlight this individual connection.  Because, while the store couldn’t envision an online site when we opened 40 years ago, the future is here.  And so, we figure out how to maintain our values regardless of the medium.

    It is why we have included this blog on our site.  It is why we are on Pinterest and Facebook.  It is why we have a staff favorites page.  Because we see these as ways that we can connect with all of you who love antique jewelry.

    Because while Isadoras has changed in some ways over the years,  at our core we are the same.  Mother and daughter, Laura Dalesandro and Elizabeth Schoenleber, pick out every piece of jewelry that goes into our store.  We still strive to meet the needs of each individual client, although often it is now through an email or Facebook post rather than an in person consultation.

    Because as a store, we seek out a one on one connection with all our clients, whether it is through a conversation in the store, an email exchange, a moment on facebook or the knowledge that two people connected with the same piece of art, the same piece of jewelry.

  • April & The Allure of Antique Diamonds

    Every time my friend’s son, Camden, walks into our store, he asks me if I know what his birthstone is, and I tease him and say no, and then he happily declares his birthstone is the DIAMOND.

    And no wonder he is ecstatic with his birthstone.  Diamonds are amazing.  They are one of the hardest materials in the world, but more than that, they are fantastically beautiful-each filled with its own unique character.
    This character is one of the things I talk about frequently with my clients, because often people become so overwhelmed with the facts and “shoulds” about a stone--They should get a diamond worth three months salary for an engagement ring.  They should get a stone graded highly according to the GIA—They forget each diamond is its own, individual, unique, organic thing.
    A diamond’s unique qualities come both from the stone’s own individual characteristics as well as the diamond cutter’s art.
    I saw the angel in the marble and carved until I set him free. --Micheangelo

    And with antique stones you truly see the character of the stone and the stone cutter as cutting the stone in years past, was less about a prescribed formula for brightness, but about one individual looking at a stone and seeing his way to bringing out the stones individual beauty.  Old stone cutters were such artists, which is why I think I find myself drawn to stones from the late 19thcentury/ early 20th century.  Stone cutters had mastered faceting but still really had a hand in determining how they wanted to interpret those concepts.
    Because for me, a stones beauty comes from its individual sparkle, its color and its character. --MIKO

  • GREEN: Antique Jewelry, The Ultimate in High End Recycling

    Earth Day is April 22nd but we would like to make it Earth Month here at Isadoras, as we believe buying antique jewelry is an excellent way to protect the environment.  Because as more and more couples try to make green choices about everything from free trade coffee they drink to the fuel efficient car they drive, Isadoras offers what it has always has offered--A way of preserving the past and the future.

    Isadora’s sells antique and vintage jewelry. Antique jewelry is a consumer conscious alternative for couples trying to avoid not only conflict diamonds but also gold that is mined in such a way that its procurement has a damaging effect on the environment.

    By purchasing an antique ring a couple makes an investment in the future, both theirs and the worlds. They also preserve the past by curating and loving jewelry that has been around, in many cases, longer than they have.

    Why is Gold Mining Bad For the Environment?

    Mining for gold has never been a clean business, but the grime used to come primarily from dirt, as people used pickaxe, shovel and sifter to cull precious metal from the earth.  Today it is a far more toxic endeavor.

    Gold, today, is primarily produced by blasting the ground and digging up enormous tons of ore, creating large open-pit mines. The gold is culled in a process called “cyanide heap leaching”, leaving behind is not only beautiful gold but also tons of contaminated rock as well as toxic mine waste or “tailings”.  These tailings contain dozens of hazardous materials including arsenic, lead, mercury and cyanide.  If not properly taken care of, they work their way into the air, earth and water.

    The EPA stated hard rock mining generates more toxic waste than any other industry in the United States.  Which is why the “No Dirty Gold” campaign says the only way to buy “clean” gold is to opt for vintage or recycled jewelry.

    FOR A MORE COMPREHENSIVE LOOK AT THE ENVIRONEMENTAL IMPACT OF THE GOLD MINING INDUSTRY PLEASE CHECK OUT THE NEW YORK TIMES ARTICLE: Behind Gold’s Glitter: Torn Lands and Pointed Questions: http://www.nytimes.com/2005/10/24/international/24GOLD.html?pagewanted=all

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